Fill Yer Hands

you son of a

National Anthem Like You’ve Never Heard it Before

Played with a 10/22.

Kudos to @randfann, Cindy.

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Can we not make the valid argument that reduced capacity magazines are unpatriotic?

Please Help Borepatch

As we reported a couple of days ago, our friend and fellow blogger Borepatch ran afoul of the roadway in Florida and wrecked his motorcycle, breaking several ribs and his collarbone in the process.

Being the supportive and kind people we gun bloggers are, Miguel at Gun Free Zone immediately suggested a plan:

Training Wheels for Borepatch start

We have proudly stepped up to help.

Training Wheels for BorepatchPlease give.

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Of course, it occurred to me that if he were wearing his kilt at the time of the accident, we may need to raise the target, to pay for rehab for the First Responders.

More to come.

Turns Out Borepatch Does Not Bounce High

Kudos to Miguel at Gun Free Zone for the title, I could not think of a better one.

Our friend and fellow blogger Borepatch was on a motorcycle trip to Florida and met up with bad roadway, and broke some bones.

You can read an update on his condition here.

I wish  him all the best, and I have corresponded with him and told him so. My prayers are with him.

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I write this here, not to chastise anyone, but to share . . .

I am reminded of the weekend before I turned 16. My father, a consulting forensic engineer, took me to a junk yard and showed me some vehicles. Two had been driven and crashed by drunk drivers. One of them had a broken windshield and blood on the hood.

On the hood.

The driver had been the sole occupant, and had not survived.

He also showed me two motorcycles. One was still wrapped up in the front end of a pickup truck. The other was just mangled, and the rider had merely laid it down on a clear road, because of a gust of wind.

Neither rider had survived.

The trip worked. The lessons were clear: drinking and driving will get you killed, and motorcycles against anything, lose. I have never driven after drinking, and I have never ridden a motorcycle.

Why You Need to Have Rules of Engagement

In June of this year, two nutjobs walked into a pizza restaurant in Las Vegas, and shot the place up, and killed two police officers, Alyn Beck and Igor Soldo. (I will not use the names or likenesses of the killers, as you know.)

They then proceeded to Wal-Mart, and opened fire there as well. There, Joseph Wilcox, a licensed concealed firearms carrier, decided to intervene, and was killed.

Caleb Giddings posted an editorial on GunNuts shortly afterward about lessons we can learn from this shooting. In it, he points out that, while Wilcox is to be commended for making the tough decision to get involved, he had no moral duty to do so.

Later, Miguel at Gun Free Zone offered his view on incident:

The question remains: what would you do if you see an active shooting situation and you are not in immediate danger? Do you run to safety or do you engage? You decide, I can’t tell you what to do.  I can only tell you what I will do: I will engage if I can.

Miguel likens an active shooter incident to a First Responder incident, where we should offer medical attention to anyone who is injured.

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Then, last week, armed robbers tried to hold up a bar in Texas at closing time, and 2 of them were shot dead by what everyone is calling a hero.

I can’t use this man’s name, as no one knows for sure who this hero was, because he left the scene. Why? Because, unlike in Georgia, carrying a gun in a bar in Texas, licensed or not, is a felony. And he, understandably, did not want to go to jail.

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These incidents highlight something we all need to give serious thought to: everyone who owns a gun, whether they carry or not, needs to have Rules of Engagement – a set of guidelines of what you would do when confronted by various situations. The scenarios need to range from home invasion to active shooters to civil unrest.

To me it isn’t enough to just vaguely think about these things. We ought to actually list them out, and write out what our response would be. Knowing and following these rules then becomes part of your training, so that you know what you are going to do, just like whether you will perform a tactical reload or not, or whether you will reholster or not.

I did this, several years ago, and I have shared this with my family. That way, if they happen to be with me when such an incident occurs, they will know how I am going to act, and they will know how to act themselves, in a way that doesn’t get them hurt.

For instance, everyone in my family knows that when we go out to dinner, I get a seat facing the door. If we are in a booth, I get to sit on the end. These should be obvious, but we discussed them nevertheless. Yes, they can become a humorous item at times, but they still get followed.

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This leads me to the real topic of this post, which is that my Rules of Engagement differ from Caleb’s and Miguel’s, because unless I or my family or those I am tasked to protect are threatened, I won’t engage. I am not here to be a hero, and if you are not my family or in my care, I am not here for you.

On the other hand, I am willing to do whatever it takes to protect my family. When it was illegal to carry in restaurants or bars in Georgia, that meant I was willing to go to jail to save them, if I had to.

I still am, because their lives are worth more to me that freedom. And, if by my actions I can show how silly some law is, and it gets changed, all the better. I hope lawmakers in Texas will see that the laws prohibiting carry in bars did nothing to dissuade the robbers, so they need to be changed.

I can list a myriad of reasons for my rules, but the best one, sadly, is the reason Joseph Wilcox died in Wal-Mart – Uncertainty. He engaged a target, not knowing there was another, and that target killed him.

I am going to limit my uncertainty. I am willing to allow it in order to defend myself or my family, but beyond that, no.

That, of course, is something you will need to decide for yourself.

 

 

 

 

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