Fill Yer Hands

you son of a

Using A Hot News Item to Advance Gun Rights

FlagsGiven today’s Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, many are calling for using the same argument of 14th Amendment guarantees of equal protection under the law to push for national reciprocity for concealed carry licenses.

While I have pointed out previously that a national law requiring reciprocity would be unconstitutional under the 10th Amendment (and I won’t go into that argument today), I can see where a 14th Amendment argument might have some merit, provided the result isn’t that they then say that we must adhere to the most stringent carry licensing requirements. And don’t think the left wouldn’t make that argument.

But my point today is that while we need to strike now to take advantage of the hottest news item, let’s go one step further, and take advantage of the slightly less recent full court coverage of America’s new-found abhorrence of all things Confederate.

It should be obvious to anyone who studies the history of gun control in America, but the current concept of licensing concealed carry goes back to the Jim Crow era in the South, following the war. So, we should strike while the anti-racist iron is hot, and demand a repeal of concealed carry licenses altogether. 

If we are going to take advantage of a hot news item, let’s go all the way. Demand equal protection under the law, without government interference, and take it to its logical conclusion.  Anything else is a waste of a good opportunity.

Thoughts on the Confederate Flag

Confed Flag

I was born in Georgia, which, for those born abroad or on Mars, was at one time part of the Confederate States of America. I had relatives on both my father’s and mother’s side of the family who fought for the CSA, and in fact, my mother’s grandmother’s uncle died in the war. But we never owned slaves, and no one in our family ever talked about the war being about anything other than defending our home.

Growing up less than a hundred years after “Reconstruction,” there was still quite a bit of attention given in my home town to this period in our history. In fact, playing in the woods behind our home, we came across wide ditches, which we found out later were entrenchments.

Now, it’s not like my family were living in some Olde South bastion, where we recalled the grand old days. It’s just that this was our heritage, and we thought about it, and talked about it. And some time growing up I acquired a Confederate Battle Flag. It wasn’t any symbol of defiance as I remember, I just got one.

It wasn’t a big deal.

Soon, I was studying chemical engineering at Georgia Tech, and I took the opportunity to join the Co-op Program, which allowed me to essentially work as a full time engineer every other quarter, then come back and study. My engineering job was at an oil refinery in Kentucky, and I spent 6 months a year away from home. Now, despite the southern heritage of our neighbors in Kentucky, there were not many Southerners participating in the Co-op Program, and to show my Southern ass heritage, I took to flying the Battle Flag draped over the curtains in my bedroom in the apartment where I stayed. The Yankees from Purdue and Michigan State and Ohio State all gave me hell for it, and I strutted even more my Southern Pride.

Then, one quarter, a strange thing happened. I had a black roommate, from nearby in West Virginia.

Soon he and I became friends, and we shared our faith, and he shared some really good food that his Mom would send back with him after a weekend at home.

But after a few weeks, he came to me one afternoon, and asked me why I had the flag in my bedroom. I told him, honestly, that I had it for a while, and that I displayed it mostly to confound the Yankees in the other apartments.

Then he, quietly, told me about what it meant to him. Segregation. Hate. Violence. He told me about growing up black, and how he knew what it meant to certain whites, who meant him and his family harm. He told me, too, that he suspected that I had it just because, and not as any symbol of hatred, because I never showed him anything other than respect and friendship. But, he still got those feelings every time he saw it in my room, and he felt he needed to tell me.

To be honest, I had heard that before, but to hear it first hand, from someone I knew, was different.

Jesus taught that we are to love one another as He loved us. And He taught us that, if our hand causes us to stumble, or to be an offense, then we are better off to cut it off, than to risk the offense.

So, I took down the Battle Flag, and I have never flown it again.

An Argument Against Campus Carry

Courtesy of Robert M at Great Satan Inc., I ran across a statement from Michael Crow, President of Arizona State University.

Mr. Crow writes:

Can you imagine a crowded college lecture hall in which one student pulls a handgun and fires a shot, then a dozen more students, untrained in the use of firearms and how to handle potentially deadly situations, all pull out their guns? Innocent people would be caught in a deadly crossfire of panicked students firing in every direction. And what does the SWAT team do when it arrives? How do they know which of a dozen or more armed and possibly firing shooters is the bad guy? Or do they take out everyone with a gun?

As Robert points out, we are asked to imagine, because no such incident has ever occurred.

Instead, I suggest to the reader, and Mr. Crow:

Can you imagine a crowded school where two disaffected students fire at students at will, and kill 12 students, because no one at the school is armed? Of course you can, that was Columbine.

Can you imagine a crowded school where a disaffected student fires at students at will, and kills 2 students? But this time, his rampage is halted by a teacher who retrieved his own legal gun from his car? Of course you can, that was Pearl.

Can you imagine a crowded school where any number of disaffected students thought better of bringing guns to school, because the teachers and staff were armed? Maybe not, because that doesn’t make the news. But carry at school is legal in Israel, and when was the last time you heard of an Israeli school massacre?

Yet Another Open Carry Idiot

Okay, we get it. Open carry is legal, and a protected part of our Second Amendment rights.

Yet, another idiot decides he will open carry at the busiest airport in the world, because it’s his right. And, in typical and totally expected fashion, the left call for More Laws. Because it’s obvious we have to stop this man, and of course the real terrorists who attack airports in places like Los Angeles will be stopped. Well done, Hank Johnson.

But back to the idiot shown above, what he fails to consider (or considers, and totally discounts, which may be worse) is, as I have pointed out, on more that one occasion, that this puts fear in the hearts of those who otherwise have no opinion on the issue. As with most issues, we on one side or the other see it as 50 – 50. In truth most things in America are at best 45 – 10 – 45, with a 10 percent core that doesn’t really care one way or the other, and they go with the wind.

And, it is those core 10 percent who we may have to rely on, should a vote ever come up to repeal the Second Amendment. But if we scare the living pants off them with our open carry antics, we may see the wind shift.

So please, stop being stupid on open carry.*

 

 

*DISCLAIMER – As always, I am not saying that all those who open carry are stupid. I open carry on occasions where it is warranted. But if you open carry to prove some point about open carry, that’s stupid.

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