Fill Yer Hands

you son of a

Thoughts on Gun Safety

I saw an interesting post over on GunPros.com on the Rules of Gun Safety, which I thought I would share. Take a look here.

Honestly, most of them seem to be expansions of Rule 1, except their Rule 9 is my Rule Zero. But it’s worth a read.

I really like them pointing out that everyone is a Range Safety Officer. If you see anything unsafe, point it out and take action. Your life and that of others depends on it.

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Ups and Downs

Well, after a great GSSF match in March, my USPSA match at the end of April went a little bit the other way. I managed to miss at least one target in all but one of the eight stages.

Why?

Because I don’t read my own blog: “So where is this [good shooting] coming from? Dry fire. I’m spending at least 15 minutes a day in my office dry firing, smoothing up my trigger pull. about a third of that is draw and fire, to speed up my first shot and make it accurate.”

Did I keep up dry firing in April? No.

So I know what to do. Better times coming in May, if I do.

Thank you for listening to my rant.

By the way, the picture above is a new cart, replacing my Shooting Stroller. Look for a post on it, to come.

 

How I Shoot GSSF

In my post yesterday about my return to GSSF, I talked about how I felt my extra time on Glock the Plates was probably because that was my first shots of the day, with no warm up. Butch Barton commented that I shouldn’t shoot the plates first, but rather 5 to Glock, them Glock M, then the plates at the end. I have to admit, I agree with Butch, and, in fact, that’s normally the way I shoot it. However, when I showed up at the GSSF match, I let convenience get the best of me, and when I saw I could shoot second at the Plates, I took it. Bad call.

This led me to think about my strategy for shooting the GSSF stages, and how I have tweaked them over the years. So, here are my strategies for shooting the GSSF stages.

5 to Glock

Strategy: Shoot the farthest targets first, then work my way to the nearest.

Why: I have found I can shoot 25 yard targets well, if I take my time and line up the sights correctly. Closer in, I can almost double-tap them and do well. But if I start close in and work my way out, I don’t take the discipline to line up the sights on the farthest targets, and this leads to the Dreaded Mike.

Glock M

Strategy: From right to left, shoot the paper targets in order, then shoot the steel target(s).

Why: Consider – I have 11 rounds loaded, and it takes 8 rounds to engage the paper targets. This leaves 3 for the steel. I have found that, on a bad day, I can miss the plates with the first few shots. So, worst case scenario, if I go left to right, and take 4 shots on the steel, that means I am out of ammo by the time I get to the last paper target. So I make sure I have shot all the paper, then I have 3 rounds for the steel. If I miss with the first one, I take a concerted moment to line up my sights and hit it on the second shot.

I will admit, I am much better shooting steel at the Glock M distance of 11 yards than I used to be, and I haven’t missed the steel in quite a while. But this strategy still works best for me.

Glock the Plates

Strategy: Treat each plate as a separate target, and use the recoil energy to move me to the next target. If I miss, I come back to the standing targets once I am done with all 6.

Why: What can I say? There are maybe a hundred YouTube videos on how to shoot plates. My favorite is by Rob Leatham. The last half is a commercial for his plate rack, but the strategy is good:

So, in summary, be strategic, be committed, and be safe.

Back At It

2019 has started out well as the year of my return to competitive shooting, and I am working to keep it going.

It started with USPSA at Cherokee Gun Club, and River Bend Gun Club. As I reported before, I decided to switch from Production to Limited Minor, and, while I can’t say I’ve seen a big difference, not having to plan my stage based on 10 rounds is rather nice. I now pack 18 rounds, plus one in the chamber if I need it, and this usually means only one mag change.

The result of this is I am shooting the Classifiers well enough that I think I can start out as a C class Limited shooter, once I get 6 scores. Seeing that I spent 7 years as a D class Production shooter, I feel good about it.

The next news came from the GSSF match in Dawsonville on March 16, where I shot 94.16, beating my best match ever by over 8 points. I did this y have zero Mikes, and by shooting my fastest times ever on 5 to Glock and Glock M.

Of course, being a perfectionist, I look at Glock the Plates and ask why I didn’t do my best ever, there? But it was easy to see – my stages went 10.47 >> 9.21 >> 6.12 >> 6.21. Since this was my first stage, the answer, to me, is warm up. I could have shot it 7 seconds or so faster. But I’ll take it.

So where is this coming from? Dry fire. I’m spending at least 15 minutes a day in my office dry firing, smoothing up my trigger pull. about a third of that is draw and fire, to speed up my first shot and make it accurate.

And, I have to admit, watching myself on YouTube, my next area to work on needs to be to lose weight and speed up. Given I have always had catcher speed, I don’t know if losing the weight will really work, but it can’t hurt.

More to come!

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