Fill Yer Hands

you son of a

Sometimes This Is What It Takes


First, my prayers are with the people of Paris tonight. The attacks there only go to prove that the enemies of freedom are everywhere, and are unlikely to end any time soon without our resistance.

Jim Scouten summed it up on Facebook thus: “Soft Targets. We are watching our future play out tonight in Paris.” That’s what we are. Soft Targets.

The realization of this hit home for us tonight as we watched. My wife, though, rather than being afraid, got very angry, yelling things at the TV that I know she had heard me say for a long time – how free citizens can only remain free as long as they are free to defend themselves. How we must all be prepared, both by arms and by training and practice, because we never really know when and where the danger will appear.

In the past, she would hear me say it, and just nod. After all, we really didn’t have so much to fear.

And she would always defend me to the kids – oh, that’s just your Dad.

But tonight, she came to see that it wasn’t just me, it was the truth. It was the way the world is. And she decided it was time to start getting ready.

First, she joined the NRA and After all, it’s best to be in like company. And, if we are to win, we will need to do it together. So she’s in.

Next, we’re headed out tomorrow to go gun shopping. She knows what she wants, and she’ll get it: a Gen4 Glock17 or Glock19. She’s shot mine before, and the Lord knows we have a ton of magazines that will fit it.

Then next week, down to the probate court for a Weapons Carry License.

Then, off to practice with me.

I can only hope this same thing happened tonight in a thousand other homes. Honestly it’s the only hope we have.

Proof That Media Bias is Designed Into the System

OKC Crash

On Saturday, October 24, an allegedly drunk woman ran her car into a crowd at the end of the Homecoming parade at Oklahoma State University, killing at least 4 people, and injuring over 30. A nation waited for news, and struggled to understand how someone could do something like this.

The next day, the Traverse City, Michigan, newspaper the Record-Eagle ran this story about the event on page 3.


At first glance, one would think the headline writer neglected to read the article.

But then the Record-Eagle upped the derp in its retraction by admitting what we already suspected:

Clearing record

At first I thought they were blaming the printing team. But now I see that this belies their assumption that incidents of multiple deaths or injuries must involve a shooter. Not a driver, or an earthquake, or a flood. And this assumption is so ingrained, they made it their normal page design.

I guess in the race to get the attention of the gun haters, it pays to save time any way you can.



Lessons Learned from Everyday Carry

03_Concealed_Carry_CC_Inner_PhotoTom McHale posted a nice article a couple of weeks ago, about 10 Things You Learn By Carrying a Gun Every Day.

This got me to thinking about the lessons I’ve learned, and I would like to share a few.

I’ve been carrying a gun almost everywhere for about the last 14 years or so, ever since we moved to Georgia. Before that I carried from time to time, mostly for travel, but not to work, and not during most social events. My reasons why I didn’t carry are probably the good subject of another post, for another day.

But now, carrying almost all the time, I’ve come to learn some things. I agree with Tom McHale’s first four points, and I have experimented with a few belts and holsters, to find the ones that work best for me.

Having said that, here are some observations and Lessons Learned:

Condition Yellow takes concentration, but that’s not a bad thing. Once you get used to it, it gets a little easier.

But it still takes concentration. A lapse in that – slipping into Condition White – may be the last thing I experience in this life.

It takes thought and concentration in other areas, too. Like planning ahead for bathroom breaks. You have to have a plan.

More people carry than you think. I routinely look for telltales when others are carrying, as much out of curiosity as to know who would be on my side if the balloon went up.

It’s no big deal to my wife and kids. Once they got used to me carrying, and asking for the seat facing the door, etc., it became almost second nature.

Sometimes my wardrobe is dictated by my choice to carry. But that isn’t as big a deal as I thought it would be. Of course, gone are sweat pants in public. At my age, that’s not such a bad idea, though. As it turns out, I have become a Hawaiian shirt aficionado in warmer months, and a fleece vest guy in the cooler months.

At least in Georgia, Gun Free Zones are pretty much worthless to me. I can discuss this in another post, but I generally ignore the signs, since, for the most part, they have no legal force in Georgia. But exceptions are exceptions (like the Post Office), and those I do honor. For the rest of you (and this means you, Taco Mac) I don’t pay any attention. Trust me, if I’m there when something goes down, you won’t care that I’m violating your sign.

Despite what movies and some online Gun Heroes want you to think, if the balloon goes up, I am there to protect me and my family. Unless there is a compelling reason, that means I’m not chasing any bad guys or saving anyone but us. Sorry.

More to come, I am sure . . .

An Open Letter to My Son, the College Student

Dear Son:

Congratulations on your success, here in your freshman year at Georgia State University. I really can’t tell you how proud your Mom and I are of you, and how much you have accomplished!

I know you know this, because it was emphasized more than once at the Orientation that we attended with you, but, despite all the evidence that it does nothing for your safety, Georgia State University, like all schools in our state, are Gun Free Zones. That means that the only people who are allowed to carry guns on campus are law enforcement officers and criminals.

So I am writing you today to remind you that, in the event that someone ever comes in your classroom carrying a gun, you must make a quick assessment:

  • Are they in uniform? If so, does it appear they are looking for someone, or are they there to do harm? (Remember, the shooter at Fort Hood was in uniform, so it’s not a perfect assumption that they are benign.)

If they are not in uniform, or they appear to be there in any capacity other than as a law enforcement officer looking for someone armed, then you and everyone else in the room should immediately grab desks, chairs, backpacks, lamps, and everything you can, and beat the living shit out of this person, until they stop moving.

Don’t wait for them to start taking a religious survey. Don’t wait for them to start shooting. Don’t be fooled by their demeanor. Don’t wait for anything.


Then, once they stop moving, kick their gun out of their way, and get out of the classroom. Don’t leave campus, and be prepared to speak to the police.

Above all, remember that a Gun Free Zone doesn’t have to be a Gun Free Victim Zone. Act, and you can make a difference.

Stay alert. And act.


With all my love,


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