Concealed Carry Reciprocity Expansions for Georgians

GA Welcome Sign

There are a couple of very recent additions to the states that recognize my Georgia Weapons Carry License:

South Carolina

Effective upon signing of the law on June 3, 2016, South Carolina recognizes Georgia WCLs, and with the announcement of the Georgia Attorney General Sam Olens, Georgia recognizes permits from South Carolina. You can see a great summary of SC gun laws here.

Virginia

Effective July 1, 2016, Virginia will recognize permits issued by all other states, with some conditions listed on that page. Other Virginia requirements are listed here.

Georgia will recognize Virginia permits once their recognition goes into effect, and the Attorney General so announces.

Personally, both of these ease the restrictions I have faced travelling from Georgia, especially since South Carolina is contiguous, and one of my major clients is in Greenville. Now I don’t have to stop at the rest stop on the way out and put my pistol in the glove box. This will also make my next trip to the DC area better.

 

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Posted in CCW

Making the Best of It

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So, 19 days after starting my second round of chemotherapy for leukemia, my blood test results pretty much show I have started to bottom out. My ANC was 0.1, which is as low as they show on the test.

So I’m now confined to home, except for clinic visits every other day. Today to pass time, I commenced to checking off a To-do box, and started watching The Pacific.

Meanwhile I cleaned my pistols, and made an embarrassing discovery: the pistol I carry almost every day, Liberty, my G19, had collected an unsightly amount of dust, mostly around the magwell, but also up under the slide, around the firing pin safety and connector. It didn’t take a lot to clean it, but I really don’t know how it might have affected the operation if I had needed to use it.

So now I am going to set a goal to inspect and clean Liberty every Friday or Saturday.

In the meantime, dry fire and study are my assignment. I can’t shoot until I get the IV line removed from my arm, so that’s what I’m left with. But I’ll take it, because like my chemo, it should lead to better things down the road.

The Real Solution for National CCW Reciprocity

CCW is racist

Last week, the Attorney General in Virginia decided to cancel reciprocity with 25 other states. The uproar around the country among gun enthusiasts was considerable. This brought up, once again, the issue of a national reciprocity law, which, as I pointed out, would be unconstitutional under the Tenth Amendment.

Now, in no way was that post meant to suggest that I am not a fan of universal reciprocity for carry permits. In fact, I believe that insofar as a government has the right to place prerequisites on the exercise of my civil rights by requiring that I obtain a permit to do so, then no government has the right to decide that the decision of any other government is null and void in its jurisdiction.*

But, given that the Constitution does not give Congress the authority to regulate carry permits, or the carry of guns, how then do we accomplish this?

I mentioned in my last posting that one argument cited for government mandated reciprocity is the Driver’s License system. After all, they argue, since my driver’s license is recognized by other states, my carry permit should be as well. While I agree with that premise, most people who argue this route don’t realize that this is the result of an agreement between the States, not because of any law.

What, then, should be our answer?

For me it is simple: abolish the carry permit system altogether.

Why? Because it’s unnecessary, under any understanding of the Second Amendment.

And yet, states require carry permits, and most of us think nothing of it. In fact, we make a big deal of it. “Look at me!” we rejoice. “The Government has acceded to grant me its begrudging permission to exercise a right already guaranteed under the Constitution!”

Naturally, the anti-gunners will argue that without a permit system any criminal would be allowed to carry a gun. How would we be protected from such a thing?

And yet, it should be obvious that criminals carry a gun now without permits. The law does not change their actions, because, by definition, they are criminals.

So, how do we get the permit system revoked?

Unfortunately, we white Americans are going to have to be honest about our white forefathers, and be honest about how it all began – as a way to keep guns out of the hands blacks. So to make the permit system go away, we have to show how racist the whole system was, and how that discrimination carries over to today, by allowing the government to know just who owns guns.

Think about how effective this would be, to tie in the carry permit system with the images of Jim Crow, the Confederacy, and the KKK.

Can we do this? Yes. Will we do this? I don’t know, but I hope so. Because, honestly, it is the best route to national reciprocity – by making every American equal.

At last.

 

The Right Kind of Reciprocity

On Wednesday, Governor Wayne LePage of Maine signed a law making Maine the sixth State to not require any permit to carry a concealed weapon.

As I have stated before, given the patently racist nature of gun permits in America, we should take advantage of the current public outrage against anything remotely discriminatory, and push for an elimination of all permit requirements.

At least this is a start. Well done, Maine.

Using A Hot News Item to Advance Gun Rights

FlagsGiven today’s Supreme Court ruling on same-sex marriage, many are calling for using the same argument of 14th Amendment guarantees of equal protection under the law to push for national reciprocity for concealed carry licenses.

While I have pointed out previously that a national law requiring reciprocity would be unconstitutional under the 10th Amendment (and I won’t go into that argument today), I can see where a 14th Amendment argument might have some merit, provided the result isn’t that they then say that we must adhere to the most stringent carry licensing requirements. And don’t think the left wouldn’t make that argument.

But my point today is that while we need to strike now to take advantage of the hottest news item, let’s go one step further, and take advantage of the slightly less recent full court coverage of America’s new-found abhorrence of all things Confederate.

It should be obvious to anyone who studies the history of gun control in America, but the current concept of licensing concealed carry goes back to the Jim Crow era in the South, following the war. So, we should strike while the anti-racist iron is hot, and demand a repeal of concealed carry licenses altogether. 

If we are going to take advantage of a hot news item, let’s go all the way. Demand equal protection under the law, without government interference, and take it to its logical conclusion.  Anything else is a waste of a good opportunity.

The Bad News About a National CCW Reciprocity Law

The powers not delegated to the United States by the Constitution, nor prohibited by it to the States, are reserved to the States respectively, or to the people.

Tenth Amendment to the Constitution of the United States

From time to time I read about proposals for a national law requiring reciprocity of concealed carry permits between the states. The most recent example is the Constitutional Concealed Carry Reciprocity Act, introduced by Senator John Cornyn, R-TX.

Sadly, I have some bad news about this proposal, and about a national CCW reciprocity law in general: It would be unconstitutional under the Tenth Amendment.

Consider:

Nothing in the US Constitution gives Congress the authority to regulate the issuing or honoring of concealed carry permits issued by the States. In fact, nothing in the Constitution addresses concealed carry permits at all. Therefore, Congress has no authority to order the States to honor permits from other States.

Now, let me say that I am in no way saying we should not be able to carry a concealed weapon. And, I am not saying that my Georgia Weapons Carry License should not be honored in other states. However, the method by which this is accomplished is the issue at hand, and the current proposal doesn’t pass muster.

As an intelligent American, you know this to be true, even if you wish it were not.

There are several camps out there who make arguments that we should support this unconstitutional law. Let’s take a look at one.

The Driver’s License Argument

“The law should force States to honor my carry permit, like it forces them to honor my driver’s license.”

This claim, unfortunately, is based on ignorance. The honoring of drivers’ licenses is the result of an agreement among the States called the Driver Licence Agreement.  Does that sound familiar? It should, because that’s what currently regulates reciprocity of carry permits – agreements between the States.

Why not a law? Because nothing in the Constitution gives Congress authority over licensing drivers, and at one time, we actually paid attention to the Constitution.

Thank God.

Think about it: the Federal government already will retain highway funds from States, unless they institute laws it agrees with, and mandates, like the right speed limits, or the right drinking age. Federal control of drivers’ licenses would open us all to such abuse as we can only imagine.

And if you follow that line of reasoning, you can then cut off the next line of reasoning for federal carry permit reciprocity: “Why don’t we just pass a law (or amendment) giving the feds authority over carry permits?”

Oh.

My.

God.

That, my friends, leads exactly where you think it leads.

Now, I know this is a big disappointment to a lot of people. Believe me, I wish we could have it, too, but I am not willing to give up my Constitutional rights for something I want, and you shouldn’t be, either.

As always, I welcome your reasoned discussion on this issue.

 

 

Coming tomorrow – the answer to CCW reciprocity.

GeorgiaCarry Sues Over School Carry Law

As I reported last year, the Georgia Legislature passed a law, HB 826, which Governor Deal signed, that exempts GWCL holders from prosecution for carrying weapons within school zones.

As one might expect, the idea that HB 286 actually allows what it says it allows was disputed, most notably by the Georgia Attorney General.

And, as one might expect, GeorgiaCarry.Org has filed a lawsuit to force the State to read the words in the law, and enforce the law as written.

More to come, I am sure . . . .