The Right Kind of Reciprocity

On Wednesday, Governor Wayne LePage of Maine signed a law making Maine the sixth State to not require any permit to carry a concealed weapon.

As I have stated before, given the patently racist nature of gun permits in America, we should take advantage of the current public outrage against anything remotely discriminatory, and push for an elimination of all permit requirements.

At least this is a start. Well done, Maine.

Yet Another Open Carry Idiot

Okay, we get it. Open carry is legal, and a protected part of our Second Amendment rights.

Yet, another idiot decides he will open carry at the busiest airport in the world, because it’s his right. And, in typical and totally expected fashion, the left call for More Laws. Because it’s obvious we have to stop this man, and of course the real terrorists who attack airports in places like Los Angeles will be stopped. Well done, Hank Johnson.

But back to the idiot shown above, what he fails to consider (or considers, and totally discounts, which may be worse) is, as I have pointed out, on more that one occasion, that this puts fear in the hearts of those who otherwise have no opinion on the issue. As with most issues, we on one side or the other see it as 50 – 50. In truth most things in America are at best 45 – 10 – 45, with a 10 percent core that doesn’t really care one way or the other, and they go with the wind.

And, it is those core 10 percent who we may have to rely on, should a vote ever come up to repeal the Second Amendment. But if we scare the living pants off them with our open carry antics, we may see the wind shift.

So please, stop being stupid on open carry.*

 

 

*DISCLAIMER – As always, I am not saying that all those who open carry are stupid. I open carry on occasions where it is warranted. But if you open carry to prove some point about open carry, that’s stupid.

How History Might Have Been Different

Pistol Choices
What if they were Tauruses?

As I have reported before, when I shopping for my first handgun in 1992, I was at a gun store in Marietta, Georgia, and  had decided to buy a Taurus PT92, the Brazilian copy of the Beretta 92. However, when the clerk asked for my identification so he could run my background check, I discovered that, as an Alabama resident, I could not legally purchase a handgun in Georgia.

Why? Good question. The originators claimed it would cut down on gun trafficking by criminals, since they could not be sure that an out-of-state purchaser was legally allowed to by a gun. There was no easy way to run a background check on someone out of state in a reasonable length of time.

Given the improvements in communications since the law was first passed, and especially in light of the National Instant Criminal Background Check System, or NICS, this argument has become invalid.

And, finally, the courts have agreed, as a federal appeals court ruled today that disallowing interstate handgun sales through licensed FFL holders was unconstitutional under the Second Amendment.

This should mean that eventually, once the BATFE sends guidance to gun stores and FFL holders, we would be able to buy handguns through any FFL holder, no matter where it is located.

Now, given my penchant for Glocks (having bought, instead of the Taurus, a Glock 17, upon return to Alabama), how would my life be different today, had I bought the Taurus?

Would I have won free Tauruses in the Taurus Shooting Sports Foundation matches?Gunny and me

Whose pictures would I have in the office, if not the Gunny?

I can only wonder.

GeorgiaCarry Sues Over School Carry Law

As I reported last year, the Georgia Legislature passed a law, HB 826, which Governor Deal signed, that exempts GWCL holders from prosecution for carrying weapons within school zones.

As one might expect, the idea that HB 286 actually allows what it says it allows was disputed, most notably by the Georgia Attorney General.

And, as one might expect, GeorgiaCarry.Org has filed a lawsuit to force the State to read the words in the law, and enforce the law as written.

More to come, I am sure . . . .